24 4 / 2014

notagoodusername360:

ingthing:

notagoodusername360:

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.



Your honor, something is amiss here!
As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 
Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

Where are the bar codes?!
This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 


Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!


Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—
…! I’ve got it!)
While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 
Well, Edgeworth?



While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.
Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?
Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

(W-wait, but I’m not—)


WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!


As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!
A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!
Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 
The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the stickers on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Reel Justice: The Courtroom Goes to the Movies”!
Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!
How’s that for decisive evidence?




…It’s true that the books are definitely in the library, but look at the books that are immediately next to it, on the left side!

Specifically, the one that is titled “Lowering The Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”. Therefore, the shelf is clearly on the culture surrounding the law itself and popular culture relating to the legal world!

I hardly think it’s odd to see the Ace Attorney manga as an example of either humor in the legal world OR popular culture relating to the law!

O-Oh. I guess you have a point there…
…

…
Hey, wait a minute, pal!
Don’t go pullin’ the wool over my eyes here!

The University Library’s Online Database clearly shows that the comics are filed under “Law and Popular Culture”!
See?

It doesn’t matter whether those comics are related to the section or not; they’ve been listed under it in this library, and that’s nothing but the truth!
And since they’re filed under “Law and Popular Culture”, they’re in the exact right place they’re supposed to be!

The books next to those comics have little stickers that say “Law Pop Culture” on them! That proves the books are on the shelf meant for the “Law and Popular Culture” books!
You can’t fool me so easily, pal!



Oh, I’m not disputing the fact THAT the library owns them…

…but rather, the significance of the original testimony in light of this fact!

Recall, the witness clearly stated, “THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I’M CRYING”

However, as we have just learned, they were in a section explicitly dedicated to depictions of the law in popular culture… Which perfectly makes sense! So let me ask you….

Why did the witness act like seeing the manga in that particular part of the library was such a big deal?!? I’ll tell you why…


The witness has been DELIBERATELY MISLEADING this court this whole time!!!

notagoodusername360:

ingthing:

notagoodusername360:

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.

image

image

Your honor, something is amiss here!

As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 

Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

image

Where are the bar codes?!

This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 

Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!

image

Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 

image
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—

image
…! I’ve got it!)

While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 

Well, Edgeworth?

While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.

Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?

Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.

image
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

image

(W-wait, but I’m not—)

image

WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!

As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!

A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!

Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 

The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the stickers on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Reel Justice: The Courtroom Goes to the Movies”!

Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!

How’s that for decisive evidence?

…It’s true that the books are definitely in the library, but look at the books that are immediately next to it, on the left side!

Specifically, the one that is titled “Lowering The Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”. Therefore, the shelf is clearly on the culture surrounding the law itself and popular culture relating to the legal world!

I hardly think it’s odd to see the Ace Attorney manga as an example of either humor in the legal world OR popular culture relating to the law!

O-Oh. I guess you have a point there…

Hey, wait a minute, pal!

Don’t go pullin’ the wool over my eyes here!

The University Library’s Online Database clearly shows that the comics are filed under “Law and Popular Culture”!

See?

It doesn’t matter whether those comics are related to the section or not; they’ve been listed under it in this library, and that’s nothing but the truth!

And since they’re filed under “Law and Popular Culture”, they’re in the exact right place they’re supposed to be!

The books next to those comics have little stickers that say “Law Pop Culture” on them! That proves the books are on the shelf meant for the “Law and Popular Culture” books!

You can’t fool me so easily, pal!

Oh, I’m not disputing the fact THAT the library owns them…

…but rather, the significance of the original testimony in light of this fact!

Recall, the witness clearly stated, “THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I’M CRYING

However, as we have just learned, they were in a section explicitly dedicated to depictions of the law in popular culture… Which perfectly makes sense! So let me ask you….

Why did the witness act like seeing the manga in that particular part of the library was such a big deal?!? I’ll tell you why…

The witness has been DELIBERATELY MISLEADING this court this whole time!!!

(via liamdryden)

24 4 / 2014

Brandon Flowers in The Killers Music Videos

(Source: thiscouldberealsimple)

24 4 / 2014

The Killers + Tim Burton appreciation post

Favorite director + favorite band = PERFECT

(Source: ineedirectiontoperfection, via ineedirectiontoperfection)

24 4 / 2014

Here With Me @ Wembley Stadium - June 22, 2013

(Source: ineedirectiontoperfection, via ineedirectiontoperfection)

24 4 / 2014

24 4 / 2014

(Source: BE-SEX, via be-sex)

23 4 / 2014

slurhater:

jamietheignorantamerican:

YES, there are people who find cultural appropriation and the use of slurs “ok” with them.

Does that mean it’s “ok” to do it to EVERYONE, even if they might be personally offended by it?

nOOOOOOOOOOOO.

Also it is very important to realize that your irl friends saying this shit is ok may be out of a desire to not start drama and get into arguments. I fucking detest when straight people say faggot but I have a few straight friends who do and it is just not worth the shit to tell them to stop.

(via gwenstacy)

23 4 / 2014

jas0nwaterfalls:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:

can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode? 

It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.

Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.

Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.

Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.

Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.

The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.

The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

pretty incredible

(via pizza)

23 4 / 2014

louisxmichael:

renirabbit:

fearliath:

do-i-smell-watermelon:

the bend

image

and slap

image

I don’t even watch Star Trek but that is the most graceful bitchslap I have ever seen.

this is amazing

UhuRAWR

(via soyunlapiz)

23 4 / 2014

itscalledfashionlookitup:

When people compare the greatness that is The Simpsons to other animated shows like Family Guy it makes me want to set myself on fire

(Source: sandandglass, via soyunlapiz)